Conference Programme

The conference program of #IDSF22 will run over the course of 3 days and is updated here continuously.
Click here to directly jump to the program sections: Day 1Day 2Day 3

Day 1

Tuesday, 31. May 2022

“Countering Malicious Activities in Cyber Space”

08.30

Registration

09.30 – 09.40

Welcome

Introduction and Opening Remarks: Moderator Ms. Cornelia Ertl, Mr. Helmut Leopold, Mr. Josef Hauk

09:30 – 09:40

Arena 21

Welcome

Ms. Cornelia Ertl, Moderator

Mr. Helmut Leopold, Initiator IDSF, Head of Center for Digital Safety & Security, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology

Mr. Josef Hauk, President of the Austrian Defence and Security Industry Group at Austrian Federal Economic Chamber

09.40 – 10.45

Opening Ceremony

Opening Speeches:
Mr. Karl Nehammer, Federal Chancellor at Republic of Austria (Video Message)

Mr. Florian Tursky, Secretary of State for Digitalisation, Austrian Federal Ministry for Finance

Ms. Faouzia Mebarki, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Algeria

Mr. Tadeusz Chomicki, Ambassador for Cyber & Tech Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Poland

Ms. Rasa Ostrauskaite, Ambassador, EU Permanent Representative to the OSCE

Mr. Erich Albrechtowitz, Ministerial Counsellor, Federal Chancellery

Mr. Raffi Gregorian, Deputy to the Under-Secretary-General and Director, United Nations Office of Counter-Terrorism (UNOCT)  

09:40 – 10:45

Arena 21

Opening Ceremony

Mr. Karl Nehammer, Federal Chancellor at Republic of Austria (Video message)

Mr. Florian Tursky, Secretary of State for Digitalisation, Austrian Federal Ministry for Finance

Ms. Faouzia Mebarki, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Algeria

Mr. Tadeusz Chomicki, Ambassador for Cyber & Tech Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Poland

Ms. Rasa Ostrauskaite, Ambassador, EU Permanent Representative to the OSCE

Mr. Erich Albrechtowitz, Deputy Director General in the Federal Chancellery

Mr. Raffi Gregorian, Deputy to the Under-Secretary-General and Director, United Nations Office of Counter-Terrorism (UNOCT)  

10.45 – 11.00

Break & Exhibition

11.00 – 11.43
KEYNOTE

What does Good look like? The Fight for a Democratic Internet

Mr. Alex Krasodomski-Jones, Director of the Centre for the Analysis of Social Media (at the UK think tank), CASM at Demos (Online)

11.00 - 11.43

Arena 21

What does Good look like? The Fight for a Democratic Internet​

Mr. Alex Krasodomski-Jones, Director of the Centre for the Analysis of Social Media (at the UK think tank), CASM at Demos (Online)

When democracies talk about the Internet, we find ourselves very good at talking about what bad looks like, but struggle to identify what good looks like. But there are competitive visions for the future of the web: from corporate missions to geopolitical ambitions. It is high time we embraced our own. Countering malicious influence online is as much about managing the present as it is about building the future. We must realise that democracies demand infrastructure - from private and public space, to a free and high-quality media - and that the twenty year experiment of oursourcing those things has failed.

11.43 – 11.45

Welcome Address on Session 1

Mr. Gerhard Karner, Minister at Austrian Federal Ministry of the Interior (Video Message)

11:43 – 11:45

Arena 21

Opening Keynote on Session 1

Mr. Gerhard Karner, Minister at Austrian Federal Ministry of the Interior (Video Message)

11.45 – 12.45
SESSION 1

Countering Terrorism:
Digital Technologies and Ethical Challenges

Ms. Margherita Natali (Online), Mr. Reinhard Schmid, Mr. Bernhard Strobl, Mr. Nelson Goncalves (Online)
Session Chair: Mr. Rocco Messina

11.35 - 12:35

Arena 21

Countering Terrorism:
Digital Technologies and Ethical Challenges

Ms. Margherita Natali, Associate Programme Management Officer, United Nations Counter-Terrorism Centre (UNCCT), New York, USA (Online)
Mr. Reinhard Schmid, Head of Central Identification Services at Austrian Federal Ministry of the Interior

Mr. Bernhard Strobl, Thematic Coordinator Digital Identity Management, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology

Mr. Nelson Goncalves, Head of the Legal Identity Unit Immigration and Border Management Division (IBM), International Organization for Migration (Online)

Session Chair: Mr. Rocco Messina, Head of Border Security and Management Unit, United Nations Counter-Terrorism Centre (UNCCT), New York, USA

Timely access to critical information about identified or suspected terrorist activities is central to counterterrorism and combatting organised crime. The exchange of information and cross-border cooperation are critical tools for investigations into transnational crimes as well as for the identification of terrorist’s activities. Understanding, anticipating, and effectively addressing current and emerging terrorism and security threats are critically important but are also among the most challenging tasks of the law enforcement community. Information exchange, in compliance with Human Rights and Data Protection standards and inter-agency cooperation, both within and between countries, while routinely touted as critical components of border security and management, have historically been difficult to achieve and remain significant challenges. The panel will discuss questions such as:

  • What are the technical and nontechnical challenges in information exchange being faced regarding counterterrorism and law enforcement?
  • What is the future of information exchange concerning transnational and international terrorist and criminal activities?
  • How can the use of transformative technologies maintain the balance between strengthened security and compliance with legislation, including Human Rights and Data Protection, in the field of counter-terrorism?

12.45 – 13.45

Lunch & Introduction Exhibition

13.45 – 14.45
SESSION 2

Virtual Currencies and Ransomware:
Combating Criminal Use

Ms. Svetlana Abramova, Mr. Georgios Th. Papadopoulos (Online), Mr. Francesco Zola (Online), Mr. Philipp Amann
Session Chair: Mr. Ross King

13.45 - 14:45

Arena 21

Virtual Currencies and Ransomware: Combating Criminal Use

Ms. Svetlana Abramova, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Computer Science, University of Innsbruck, Austria

Mr. Georgios Th. Papadopoulos, Αssistant Professor at Harokopio University of Athens (Online)

Mr. Francesco Zola, Researcher and Data Scientist, VICOMTECH (Online)

Mr. Philipp Amann, Head of Strategy, European Cybercrime Centre, Europol

Session Chair: Mr. Ross King, Head of Competence Unit Data Science & Artificial Intelligence, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology 

Virtual currencies are offering new innovations in financial markets but are also enabling criminal abuses in both the physical and digital world. By providing systems for anonymous international payments, cryptocurrencies also enable the purchase of illegal goods, financing of terrorism, new methods for money laundering, and payment channels for ransomware attacks on critical infrastructures and businesses worldwide. These are all emerging global threats that require international cooperation, new regulations, and effective investigative tools and countermeasures. For example, in October 2021, the White House National Security Council facilitated an international counter-ransomware virtual event with over 30 countries and the European Union, with the goal of accelerating cooperation to counter ransomware. In another example of international efforts, the UNODC is developing the goFintel platform, offering know-how and new tools to support the efforts of international financial intelligence units and law enforcement to more effectively combat terrorism and organised crime. 

  • How will new European legal frameworks (e.g., AML) help to combat criminal abuse of cryptocurrencies?
  • What are the technology solutions available?
  • Is decentralized finance an important new driver of financial innovation or is it an enabler for the next wave of financial fraud?

14.45 – 15.10

Break & Exhibition

15.10 – 15.30
KEYNOTE

How Digitalization has affected Integrated Border Management and what Challenges lie ahead

Mr. Antti Hartikainen, Head of Mission, European Union Advisory Mission Ukraine 

15.10 - 15.30

Arena 21

How Digitalization has affected Integrated Border Management and what Challenges lie ahead

Mr. Antti Hartikainen, Head of Mission, European Union Advisory Mission Ukraine

15.30 — 16.30
SESSION 3

Law Enforcement in a Global and Digital Age

Ms. Katrin Nyman Metcalf (Online), Mr. Paulius Klikunas (Online), Mr. Thierry Hartmann
Session Chair: Ms. Caroline Schmidt

15.30 - 16:30

Arena 21

Law Enforcement in a Global and Digital Age

Ms. Katrin Nyman Metcalf, Senior Legal Expert at the Estonian e-Governance Academy and Chairman of the Supervisory Board of the Estonian Human Rights Centre (Online)

Mr. Paulius Klikunas, Deputy Head of Fr0g Lab at Kaunas University of Technology (Online)

Mr. Thierry Hartmann, Assistant Chief Commissionner, Innovation Project Manager, Directorate for International Security Cooperation, French Ministry of Interior

Session Chair: Ms. Caroline Schmidt, Programme Director implementing the EU Cyber Security Package 2020 in the Austrian Ministry of Interior

Change is inevitable, it has an impact on law enforcement and it will require brave and proactive steps to prepare for the future. The world now is more connected than ever and is changing rapidly. While new technologies will transform the way of policing, they also change crime patterns and require a flexible but solid legal basis. Key will be to combine innovation and law enforcement in order to make the digital transformation a success story. Cyber- crime often crosses international borders with immunity making investigation, evidence collection and prosecution all the more challenging. The digital transformation is also supporting advanced techniques capturing and analysing evidence. Questions to be discussed:

  • How are digital technologies transforming law enforcement? Both positive impacts and new challenges.
  • What are some of your lessons learned and recommendations in combating cross-border cyber-crime?
  • What are current trends and what is your vision of the future for combating cyber-crime?  

16.30 – 18.00
SESSION 4

Fake New World:
The Governmental Role and Responsibilities​

Mr. Helmut Schnitzer, Ms. Dominika Hajdu (Online), Ms. Martyna Bildziukiewicz (Online), Mr. Josef Schröfl (Online)
Session Chair: Ms. Velina Tchakarova

16.30 - 18.00

Arena 21

Fake New World:
The Governmental Role and Responsibilities

Mr. Helmut Schnitzer, Head of Department Security Policy, Justice and Home Affairs, Austrian Federal Chancellery

Ms. Dominika Hajdu, Policy Director, Centre for Democracy & Resilience GLOBSEC, Bratislava (Online)

Ms. Martyna Bildziukiewicz, Head of East Stratcom Task Force, European External Action Service (EEAS) (Online)

Mr. Josef Schröfl, Deputy Director, CoI on Strategy and Defense, Hybrid CoE - The European Centre of Excellence for Countering Hybrid Threats, Finland (Online)

Session Chair: Ms. Velina Tchakarova, Director, Austrian Institute for European and Security Policy (AIES)

Access to accurate information about national conditions and events is considered a necessary condition for citizens to meaningfully participate in democratic systems. Citizen access to information about the activities and decisions of politicians is also an important condition for the on-going legitimacy of democratic systems. Governments are also expected to inform citizens about what is happening in the world beyond national borders. For these reasons, many governments see the need for national broadcasting agencies such as the UK’s BBC or Austria’s ORF. However, left unchecked, propaganda and misinformation, whether from internal or external sources, have the potential to polarise public opinion and, ultimately, to undermine democracy itself by reducing trust in democratic institutions and processes. It is therefore incumbent upon any government to also explore means of reducing and mitigating the effects of disinformation.

Furthermore, disinformation is part of novel hybrid threats that transversely cross the traditionally established remits, responsibilities, and authorities of security agencies and ministries. To counter such threats, new ways and means of collaboration must be defined and developed at the political, legal and technological levels.

  • What should the government’s role and authority be in ensuring factual news representation?
  • Do we now need information police? What does this look like? What are the dangers?

18.00

Closing Remarks / Reception & Introduction Exhibition

Day 2

Wednesday, 1. June 2022

Hall “Arena 21”:
“Protecting Digital National & International Critical Infrastructure”

Hall “Barock Suite A”:
“Understanding the Challenges of Digital Societies”

08.00

Registration

09.05 – 09.10

Welcome & Opening Speech

Introduction: Moderator Ms. Cornelia Ertl

09.10 – 09.35
KEYNOTE

Empowering a Secure Digital Life​

Mr. Wolfgang Schwabl, Chief Security Officer, A1 Telekom Austria AG

09.10 - 09.35

Arena 21

Empowering a Secure Digital Life

Mr. Wolfgang Schwabl, Chief Security Officer, A1 Telekom Austria AG

Digitalization is the process of converting information into a digital (i.e. computer-readable) format. It is not a revolution, it is an evolution that is going on.

Digitalization is a part of our life. It generates more and more data, that needs to be stored, communicated, and processed. The ICT operators provide the infrastructures needed to deploy, use and rely on digital technology in all its aspects.  What are the new threats and their trends? How can we mitigate these risks and empower a secure digital life?

09.35 – 10.35
SESSION 5

The Energy Paradigm: Digitalisation’s Need for Safe, Secure and Sustainable Energy

Ms Irene Giner-Reichl, Mr. Wolfgang Hribernik, Mr. Achim Kaspar, Mr. Rafal Jaczynski
Session Chair: Mr. Donald Dudenhoeffer

09.35 - 10.35

Arena 21

The Energy Paradigm:
Digitalisation’s Need for Safe, Secure and Sustainable Energy

Ms Irene Giner-Reichl, Ambassador (retired), President of the Global Forum for Sustainable Energy

Mr. Wolfgang Hribernik, Head of Center for Energy, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology

Mr. Achim Kaspar, Chief Operating Officer (COO), Verbund AG

Mr. Rafal Jaczynski, Cyber Security Officer (CSO), Huawei CEE & Nordic Region

Session Chair:

Donald Dudenhoeffer, Cyber Security Research Engineer at AIT Austrian Institute of Technology 

Energy is the lifeline of every society. As digitalization increases, the need for energy especially electrical energy grows proportionately. Maintaining the availability of energy and addressing the rising requirements in an environmentally friendly manner is essential for our global economy as well as society. Digitization is regarded as a hope for reducing global energy requirements and thus contributing to climate protection. So far, however, there is no evidence of this. Current studies predict that this trend has not yet materialized, and that energy consumption will increase because of digitization. Increasing energy consumption in the information and communication technology sector (ICT) and higher economic growth thwart a reduction in energy demand.

Technology advances including digitalization continue to drive increased productivity and effectiveness of traditional energy supplies, but greater strides are needed to reduce global CO2 emissions while meeting growing energy needs.  Nuclear Power is still a growing option with numerous EU States, the Middle East and the Far East.  In all cases advanced digitalization is being used to increase safety and efficiency of production.  New technologies such as small modular reactors are aggressively being pursued.  Fusion Reactors are also starting to make greater strides toward future commercialization.

  • How is digitalization transforming energy needs? What is the impact on energy infrastructure?
  • What is the role of digitalization and new technologies in promoting and enhancing safe, secure and sustainable Energy?

10.35 – 10.40
OPENING SPEECH

Opening Speech

Opening Speech: Mr. Philipp Agathonos, Head of Unit, Civilian Crisis Management, Federal Ministry for European and International Affairs, Austria

10.40 – 11.00
KEYNOTE

Digitalisation: a Driver for Sustainable Economic Development in Europe​​

Ms. Franziska Brantner, Parliamentary State Secretary, German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Climate Action (Online)

10.40 – 11:00

Arena 21

Digitalisation: a Driver for Sustainable Economic Development in Europe​

Ms. Franziska Brantner, Parliamentary State Secretary, German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Climate Action, Berlin, Germany (Online)

09.45 – 10.10
KEYNOTE

Digitalized Democracies: What’s next?​

Ms. Dominika Hajdu, Policy Director, Centre for Democracy & Resilience GLOBSEC, Bratislava

09.45 - 10.10

Barock Suite A

Digitalized Democracies: What’s next?

Ms. Dominika Hajdu, Policy Director, Centre for Democracy & Resilience GLOBSEC, Bratislava

A large part of the public opinion today is being shaped in the online environment. Grabbing of phones in the morning and checking it around 100 times a day to visit our favourite news website or scroll through social media has become a new routine.

Keeping in mind that the public opinion equals to voters’ opinion, there have been long talks about how to preserve the free online space and secure that democracies have well-, and not mis-informed, voters at the same time.

As the COVID pandemic catalysed these discussions with the surge of narratives undermining the trust in the governments and their actions, and nurturing polarisation, the invasion in Ukraine has completely changed the rules of the game.

Since late February, European (online) information space has become a part of the Russian-Ukrainian war, witnessing the extreme rise of information manipulation, cyber-attacks or activation of trolls and bots. At times when democratic societies are under attack through the online space, the response cannot be based on soft measures but should be adequate to compensate for the methods and impact of our adversary. Whereas the blockage of RT and Sputnik News in Europe was a start, next steps should be bolder and involve as broad coalition of partners as possible. To save Europe’s information space from the effects of Russian war propaganda, the EU should enact against any actors currently enabling its spread. These are not only individual pages and actors, but also every single social media platform, including Telegram or Discord. On the other hand, all pro-democratic actors must be activated and balance the information attacks by a flood of values-based and fact-checked content. These measures are only possible with the help of solid technological solutions. Now is the time to bring them to the table and act.

10.15 – 11.45
PANEL 1

Multiple Stakeholders, Multiple Challenges: Engaging with Stakeholders of Digital Societies​

Mr. Roger Clarke (Online), Mr. Ben Hundertmark (Online), Mr. Rasa Kasperienė (Online), Mr. Sajad Abedi (Online)
Panel Chair: Mr. Reinhard Kreissl

10.15 - 11.45

Barock Suite A

Multiple Stakeholders, Multiple Challenges:
Engaging with Stakeholders of Digital Societies​

Mr. Roger Clarke, Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd/University of New South Wales/Australian National University
Managing the Challenges of Digital Societies: Multi-Stakeholder Risk Assessment (Online)

Mr. Ben Hundertmark, University of Hamburg (Online)
Blue Feelings: Emotion and Affect of Digital Police Work on Social Media 

Mr. Rasa Kasperienė, Master Student, Kaunas University of Technology
Hacking for Democracy: Belarusian Cyber Partisans (Online)

Mr. Sajad Abedi, Director of Center for Cyber Security Studies, National Defense and Security Think Tank Teheran
Cyber Policy (Online)

Panel Chair: Mr. Reinhard Kreissl, Director, VICESSE

11.00 – 11.15

Break & Exhibition

11.15 – 12.00
SESSION 6

Enabling Innovation and International Cooperation: Funding Programs and Support Actions​

Ms. Jeanette Klonk, Mr. Ralph Hammer, Mr. Dieter Hampel
Session Chair: Markus Kommenda

11.15 - 12.00

Arena 21

Enabling Innovation and International Cooperation: Funding Programs and Support Actions​

Ms. Jeanette Klonk, Programme Manager, National Contact Point (NCP) Civil Security for Society, Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG);
Challenges and Opportunities for Security Research in the current Crisis and in upcoming Crises

Mr. Ralph Hammer, Director of Technology Transfer and Security Research, Austrian Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Regions and Tourism;
KIRAS – An Austrian Approach to an European Perspective

Mr. Dieter Hampel, CEO, aed – Agency for Economic Cooperation and Development;
Best Practice Austria - Austrian Initiative for Knowhow transfer within public administrations

Session Chair: Mr. Markus Kommenda, Strategic Partnership Manager at AIT Austrian Institute of Technology 

Security is an area where cooperation between multiple stakeholders is particularly important: law enforcement agencies, first responders, critical infrastructure operators and other public service providers must describe their real needs so that research institutions can work with industry to develop innovative and useful solutions. In addition, experts from the legal and social sciences should accompany these developments to ensure that they comply with all regulations and contribute to societal well-being. Moreover, many security-related challenges, such as cybersecurity, border management, organised crime and terrorism require cross-border collaboration to come up with effective solutions.

Funding programs for security R&D such as the Austrian KIRAS programme and Cluster 3 within the Horizon Europe programme have proven successful in stimulating multi-stakeholder cooperation to strengthen the security and safety of European citizens.

This session will focus on the following aspects:

  • What are the main objectives and strategies guiding security R&D programmes at national and international levels?
  • How can these programmes help to mitigate the crises that are currently so threatening?
  • Which best practice examples could be applied to counter future threats?

12.00 – 12.15
Opening Keynote on Session 7

Security Research and Development as an Essential Component for Competitiveness and Industrial Development

Mr. Andreas Reichhardt, Vice Minister at Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Regions and Tourism

12.00 - 12.15

Arena 21

Security Research and Development as an Essential Component for Competitiveness and Industrial Development

Mr. Andreas Reichhardt, Vice Minister at Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Regions and Tourism

12.15 – 13.00
SESSION 7

Security Research and Development as an Essential Component for Competitiveness and Industrial Development

Ms. Rajeshwari Krishnamurthy Online), Mr. Weixi Gong (Online), Mr. Patrick Padding (Online)
Session Chair: Mr. Philipp Agathonos

12.15 - 13.00

Arena 21

Security Research and Development as an Essential Component for Competitiveness and Industrial Development​

Ms. Rajeshwari Krishnamurthy, Visiting Fellow, Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies (IPCS), United Kingdom (Online)

Mr. Weixi Gong, Chief of Investment Promotion Division and Coordinator for the Investment and Technology Promotion Offices (ITPOs), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) (Online)

Mr. Patrick Padding, National Police of the Netherlands, Core Group Leader of European Network of Law Enforcement Technology Services (ENLETS) (Online)

Session Chair:

Philipp Agathonos, Head of Unit, Civilian Crisis Management, Federal Ministry for European and International Affairs, Austria

Covid-19 caused a global recasting of business and life process at the same time increasing the importance of digital transformation for companies, authorities, and entire societies. Digital innovations, new online offerings, remote digital services for both employees and for customers have become a matter of survival for many companies. Likewise, government entities and public institutions are faced with forced digital transformation of essential functions and public services.  Another evolution is the increased use of big data, artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning to support many of the newly digitized services for customers and citizens.

In support of the above areas, the EU has targeted efforts to drive innovations and digital transformations in the security sector and to promote cooperative research and development between science, industry, and authorities.

  • Digital Transformation for public authorities and government entities require R&D. Does the right framework and culture exist to involve public authorities in innovation and research initiatives?
  • How can public representatives be better integrated into such research projects?

11.45 – 13.00
PANEL 2

The Socio-Technicality of Digital Societies​

Mr. Andy Knapp (Online), Ms. Marion Neunkirchner, Ms. Daniela Waller, Ms. Astrid Mager
Panel Chair: Mr. Abhisek Vaish

11.45 - 13.00

Barock Suite A

The Socio-Technicality of Digital Societies​

Mr. Andy Knapp, Vice President of International Sales at Secure Code Warriors (Online)

Ms. Marion Neunkirchner, Researcher at VICESSE and Social Worker at the Justizbetreuungsagentur, Vienna
Digitization of analogue prisoner-related documentation processes in the penal system 

Ms. Daniela Waller, Senior Lecturer and Senior Researcher, UAS Technikum Vienna
Digitization of analogue prisoner-related documentation processes in the penal system 

Ms. Astrid Mager, Senior Post-Doc, Institute of Technology Assessment, Austrian Academy of Sciences
How to counter-act hegemonic search with alternative search projects from Europe 

Panel Chair: Mr. Abhisek Vaish, Indian Institute of Information Technology, Allahabad, India

13.00 – 14.00

Lunch & Exhibition

14.00 – 14.30
KEYNOTE

Smart Security in Smart Cities

Mr. Rafal Jaczynski, Cyber Security Officer (CSO), Huawei CEE & Nordic Region

14.00 - 14.30

Arena 21

Smart Security in Smart Cities

Mr. Rafal Jaczynski, Cyber Security Officer (CSO), Huawei CEE & Nordic Region

It seems to be an industry consensus that a cybersecurity and privacy doomsday will happen.  Jury is out on the date – but time is high to discuss the place. During the presentation I’ll argue that it will happen in our increasingly smart cities, and advocate for an coherent security approach and framework. One that would take into account not only the balance of threats and countermeasures, but the benefits and risks as seen from ethics, responsibility and transparency perspectives.

14.30 – 15.30
SESSION 8

Digital Transformation: Developing and Sustaining a Capable Workforce

Ms. Amira Khattab (Online), Mr. Christof Tatschl, Mr. Rodney Busquim, Mr. Àlvaro Acevedo
Session Chair: Mr. Paul Smith

14.30 - 15.30

Arena 21

Digital Transformation: Developing and Sustaining a Capable Workforce

Ms. Amira Khattab, Deloitte Cyber Partner, Deloitte, United Arab Emirates (Online)

Mr. Christof Tatschl, Deputy Commander IT and Cybersecurity Center at Österreichisches Bundesheer (Austrian Armed Forces)

Mr. Rodney Busquim, Information Technology Security Officer, Division of Nuclear Security, International Atomic Enerly Agency (IAEA)

Álvaro Acevedo, World Institute of Nuclear Security (WINS)

Session Chair:

Mr. Paul Smith, Head of AIT Cyber Range, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology

One of the greatest enablers of any cyber security program is a well training and capable work force. The transformation of industry into a new digital landscape also entails the transformation of the workforce that will use, maintain, and security the systems.  Developing and sustaining cybersecurity talent is an ongoing challenge across all industries.   Various studies show vacancies in key cybersecurity areas number close to 2 million annually.  Organizations that will conduct digital transformations must also address the need to build and sustain the required knowledge, skills, and abilities across the organization to ensure its success. This session addresses the human centric aspect of digital transformation and efforts that have been initiated to develop the needed capabilities. The panel will address questions related to

  • strategies for building and sustaining capable cyber security staff
  • experiences in delivering capability development activities
  • success stories and lessons learned

15.30 – 16.00

Break & Exhibition

14.30 – 15.00
KEYNOTE

The Digital Trinity: Datafication – Algorithmization – Platformization

Mr. Michael Latzer, Professor of Communication and Media Research, Chair of the Media Change & Innovation Division, IKMZ – University of Zurich

14.30 - 15.00

Barock Suite A

The Digital Trinity: Datafication – Algorithmization – Platformization

Mr. Michael Latzer, Professor of Communication and Media Research, Chair of the Media Change & Innovation Division, IKMZ - University of Zurich

What is concealed behind the sober technical façade of ubiquitous digitalization? The current phase of digitalization reveals itself in threefold form: as a co-evolutionary interplay of the datafication of areas of life; the algorithmization of selection processes; and the platformization of markets. This digital trinity is geared towards influencing our behavior, taking over social functions in a religion-like manner, and transforming the social order.

15.00 – 16.30
PANEL 3

Managing the Risks of Digital Societies

Mr. Abhisek Vaish, Ms. Elsa Landry, Mr. Walter Göttlich and Mr. Matt Comi (Online), Ms. Sabine Gillessen (Online)
Panel Chair: Ms. Hannah Reiter

15.00 - 16.30

Barock Suite A

Managing the Risks of Digital Societies

Mr. Abhisek Vaish, Faculty Member of Department of IT, Indian Institute of Information Technology, Allahabad
Dealing with the risks of social media platforms

Ms. Elsa Landry, International Sales Manager, Infodas GmbH
How the protection of vital networks contributes to the well-being of our societies

Mr. Walter Göttlich, Graduate Research Assistant, KU Surveillance Studies Research Center, Institute for Public Policy and Social Research, University of Kansas, USA and Mr. Matt Comi, Koller Postdoctoral Fellow, National Farm Medicine Center, Marshfield Clinic Research Institute (Online)
Experiencing Digital Homelessness: Social Inequality and Public Internet Access

Ms. Sabine Gillessen, Gillessen - digital strategies & communicating politics (Online)

Panel Chair: Ms. Hannah Reiter, Senior Researcher, VICESSE

16.00 – 16.30
KEYNOTE

European Strategy for Digitalization and Cyber Security​

Ms. Lorena Boix Alonso, Director for Digital Society, Trust and Cybersecurity within Directorate General CNECT, European Commission (Online)

16.00 - 16.30

Arena 21

European Strategy for Digitalization and Cyber Security​


Ms. Lorena Boix Alonso
, Director for Digital Society, Trust and Cybersecurity within Directorate General CNECT, European Commission (Online)

16.30 – 17.30
SESSION 9

Supply Chain Security: Addressing Cyber Vulnerabilities and Interdependencies ​

Mr. Markus Klemen, Mr. Thomas Mann, Mr. Eric Eifert (Online), Mr. Bohumil Hruska
Session Chair: Mr. Thomas Stubbings

16.30 - 17.30

Arena 21

Supply Chain Security:
Addressing Cyber Vulnerabilities and Interdependencies ​

Mr. Markus Klemen, CEO, SBA Research, Vienna

Mr. Thomas Mann, CISO, K-Businesscom AG

Mr. Eric Eifert, Executive Director, Defense & Cyber, Beacon Red LLC (Online)

Mr. Bohumil Hruska, Head of Threat Modelling, Sparx Systems

Session Chair:

Mr. Thomas Stubbings, CEO of Cyber Trust Services & Chairman of the Cybersecurity Platform of the Austrian Government

Companies and organisations in all spheres of our life and in businesses are undergoing the digital transformations to outsourced, remote and virialized services.. At first glance, the benefits are obvious: efficiencies in productivity, cost savings, better customer experience and increased innovations. Countering the benefit, however, are the security risks one assumes. Consequently, companies must assess potential vulnerabilities and risks imposed by the expanded supply chain. Likewise, as the Solar Winds and Tesla cyber-attacks illustrate, supply chain dependencies have been noted and are being targeted by threat actors.

  • What are effective strategies to managing security of the supply chain?
  • Test & Certification: How do we gain security assurance of goods and services?
  •  What roles does the government have in ensuring supply chain security?

 

17.30 – 17.50
KEYNOTE

Can Digital Sovereignty be infrastructured?​

Ms. Francesca Musiani, Deputy Director at Centre Internet et Société (CIS), French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) (Online)

17.30 - 17.50

Arena 21

Can Digital Sovereignty be infrastructured?​

Ms. Francesca Musiani, Deputy Director at Centre Internet et Société (CIS), French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) (Online)

Digital sovereignty -- the idea that states should “reaffirm” their authority over the Internet and protect their citizens, institutions, and businesses from the multiple challenges to their nation’s self-determination in the digital sphere -- is understood primarily as a legal concept and a set of political discourses. As a consequence, it is predominantly analysed by political science, international relations and international law. However, the study of digital sovereignty as a set of infrastructures and socio-material practices has been comparatively neglected. This talk will examine how the concept of (digital) sovereignty can be studied via the infrastructure-embedded “situated practices” of various political and economic projects which aim to establish autonomous digital infrastructures in a hyperconnected world.

 

17.50 – 18.50
SESSION 10

Data Sharing vs. Data Sovereignty​

Ms. Francesca Musiani (Online), Mr. Gerhard Krennmair, Ms. Györgyi Nyikos, Ms. Brigitte Lutz (Online)
Session Chair: Mr. Mario Drobics

17.50 - 18.50

Arena 21

Data Sharing vs. Data Sovereignty​ ​

Ms. Francesca Musiani, Deputy Director at Centre Internet et Société (CIS), French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) (Online)

Mr. Gerhard Krennmair, Head of Manufacturing, msg Plaut AG

Ms. Györgyi Nyikos, Executive Director, National Data Asset Management Agency, Hungary

Ms. Brigitte Lutz, Data Governance Coordinator of City of Vienna (Online)

Session Chair: Mr. Mario Drobics, Deputy Chair Austrian Gaia-X Hub, Head of Competence Unit Cooperative Digital Technologies, AIT

The ongoing diffusion of digital technologies in all areas of our 21st century economies have now led to a new culmination, the emergence of data ecosystems. As a platform that combines data from numerous providers and devices and that allocates different roles for the participants of the data community, data ecosystems are building up value through a facilitated usage of processed and enriched data and thereby are trying to balance the build-up of economies of scales and the cultivating of the necessary collaboration networks.

The innovative concept of data ecosystems is promising many new business opportunities, but at the same time it poses some difficult challenges for making the transition a success in ever more competitive environments: the selection of partners covering data producers, service and infrastructure providers and users; establishing solid governance structures and mutual trust between parties, plus ensuring operative interoperability are essential prerequesits for building new data ecosystems. Further, a safe reference architecture based on common agreed and designed standards for trustworthy data capturing, data transferring, data analysis, data processing and data usage have to be provided.

It is a declared vision of the European Union to build a data-driven economy by fostering common Data Spaces, by proposing the right regulatory frameworks regarding data governance, access, and reuse and by developing a trutful federated cloud infrastructure like the already advanced GAIA-X project and thus paving the way for AI solutions in the data field. This federated approach is intented to ensure data sourveraignity in Europe and enable new businesses based on the European values openness, transparency and trust.

To put the track of the IDSF in one summarizing conclusion: It is all about Data Protection requirements as we are familiar with in Europe as a unique approach to deal with equal market rules for diverse competitors with conditions for an open and flourishing Business, Research, Science, and Innovation compound.

Renamed speakers and panellists will discuss the wide-ranging topics and will try to find common ground for global and non-discriminating data ecosystems.

  • What are the strategic objectives regarding the utilization of data in Europe?
  • How can we ensure data protection and self souvereignity in a global environment?
  • What are the chances, requirements and risks when shifting data utilization to federated data ecosystems?

18.50

Adjourn / Reception & Exhibition

16.30 – 17.00

Break & Exhibition

17.00 – 18.30
PANEL 4

The Challenges of Artificial Intelligence in Digital Societies​

Mr. Ales Zavrsnik, Ms. Anahid Jalali, Mr. Johann Čas, Mr. Nobert Huchler (Online), Mr. Michael Heinlein (Online)
Panel Chair: Mr. Reinhard Kreissl

17.00 - 18.30

Barock Suite A

The Challenges of Artificial Intelligence in Digital Societies

Mr. Ales Zavrsnik, Professor, Institute of Criminology at the Faculty of Law Ljubljana
Algorithmic Criminal Justice

Ms. Anahid Jalali, Data Scientist, Center for Digital Safety & Security, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology
Explainability of machine learning models

Mr. Johann Čas, Institute of Technology Assessment, Austrian Academy of Sciences

Mr. Norbert Huchler and Mr. Michael Heinlein, ISF Munich - Institute for Social Science Research
"The societal challenges of AI from a social science perspective. The research project KIMeGe." (Online)

Panel Chair: Mr. Reinhard Kreissl, Director, VICESSE

18.30 – 18.45

Concluding Remarks

18.45

Adjourn / Reception & Exhibition

Day 3

Thursday, 2. June 2022

“Security and International Relations”

08.00

Registration

09.05 – 09.10

Welcome & Opening Speech

Opening Speech:
Ms. Klaudia Tanner, Minister at Austrian Federal Ministry of Defence (Video message)

09:05 – 09:10

Arena 21

Welcome & Opening Speech

Ms. Klaudia Tanner, Minister at Austrian Federal Ministry of Defence (Video Message)

09.10 – 09.30
KEYNOTE

International Digital Cooperation: The Next Step for Multistakeholderism?

Mr. Masood Karimipour, Chief of the Terrorism Prevention Branch (TPB), UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) (Online)

09.10 - 09.30

Arena 21

International Digital Cooperation: The Next Step for Multistakeholderism?

Mr. Masood Karimipour, Chief of the Terrorism Prevention Branch (TPB), UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) (Online)

09.30 – 10.30
SESSION 11

Dependencies on Critical Space Services - Space Infrastructure as a new Critical Infrastructure

Mr. Friedrich Teichmann, Mr. Kamal Anwar, Ms. Isabelle Duvaux-Béchon (Online)
Session Chair: Mr. Corneliu Tudose

09.30 - 10.30

Arena 21

Dependencies on Critical Space Services - Space Infrastructure as a new Critical Infrastructure

Mr. Friedrich Teichmann, Brigadier-General, Director of the Geospatial Institute, Austrian Armed Forces at Ministry of Defence, BMLV, Institut Militärisches GeoWesen, Austria

Mr. Kamal Anwar, Programmatic lead on UAS Digital Forensics and CFT Crypto, United Nations Office of Counter-Terrorism

Ms. Isabelle Duvaux-Béchon, Head of the Strategy and Development Office, Foresight, Strategy & Coordination Department, European Space Agency DG Services (Online)

Session Chair: Mr. Corneliu Tudose, Geographic Information System Officer, European Union Monitoring Mission in Georgia

Air space (UAS) and outer space systems (Satellites) have become not only ubiquitous but also key enablers of a wide variety of commercial, scientific, and military applications in recent years. Highly invisible, these critical infrastructures are complex and interlocked “Systems of Systems” constituting the basis for many indispensable civic services our advanced economies are long used to like global communications and worldwide navigation, the observation of earth and sea surfaces, weather forecasts, transport opportunities for urban parcel delivery, agricultural purposes, first aid steering in crisis and disaster scenarios and geospatial intelligence in the military domain.

But the advantages described above are only one side of the coin. There also undesirable outcomes from UAVs and satellites like many new vectors of attack and therefore dangerous vulnerabilities. We therefore have to discuss to a much greater extent our strategies of defense against destruction or malfunction of critical space services. And need to find scientific and technological solutions to safeguard our critical infrastructure at earth stations, the transmission paths, and our mission-oriented satellites in the orbit as well as at the ever more emerging UAV landscape in the sky to maintain the intended service qualities for our economies and the welfare of our societies. In the military domain the future of secure and safe space systems will depend on our Counterspace defense capabilities.

We will debate all the named challenges of our critical space infrastructure with a diverse expert group from different domains and angles like highly adorned military, representatives of aerial and space organisations and from the scientific community.

10.30 – 11.00

Break & Exhibition

11.00 – 12.00
SESSION 12

Enhancing Nuclear Security Globally:
Technical Advancements and New Strategies for Security

Ms. Desislava Spassova, Mr Lars van Dassen, Ms. Elena Buglova (Online), Mr. Jakob Spies, Mr. Gernot Wurzer
Session Chair: Mr. Donald Dudenhoeffer

11.00 - 12.00

Arena 21

Enhancing Nuclear Security Globally:
Technical Advancements and New Strategies for Security

Ms. Desislava Spassova, Expert in Nuclear Law at International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

Mr Lars van Dassen, Executive Director, World Institute of Nuclear Security (WINS)

Ms. Elena Buglova, Director, Division of Nuclear Security, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (Online)

Mr. Jakob Spies, Project Assistent and Mr. Gernot Wurzer, Head of Department (Development) at CBRN Defense Centre, Austrian Federal Ministry of Defence

Session Chair:

Donald Dudenhoeffer, Cyber Security Research Engineer at AIT Austrian Institute of Technology 

Nuclear Security along with Nuclear Safety seeks to protect people, property, society and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Nuclear security specifically works to work to prevent, or detect and respond, to intentional malicious acts that could result in unacceptable radiological consequence such as the theft of nuclear materials, release of radioactive material into the environment. Nuclear and other radioactive materials are used in an array of industries ranging from power generation to advanced medical treatments.  The use of advanced technologies in these industries both promotes security and safety, but can likewise provide vectors for malicious activities such as cyber-attack.

  • What has been the security impact of digital transformation and new technology integration at nuclear facilities?
  • New reactor technologies such as small modular reactors are making news? How do these systems change the current security paradigm?
  • The illicit trafficking of nuclear materials is an ongoing threat. What is the role of technology in addressing this threat?

12.00 – 13.00

Lunch & Exhibition

13.00 – 13.30
KEYNOTE

Is a Global Collective Cyber Security System possible?

Ms. Heli Tiirma-Klaar, Director of Digital Society Institute, European School of Management and Technology (ESMT), Berlin (Online)

13.00 - 13.30

Arena 21

Is a Global Collective Cyber Security System possible?

Ms. Heli Tiirma-Klaar, Director of Digital Society Institute, European School of Management and Technology (ESMT), Berlin (Online)

13.30 – 14.30
SESSION 13

Responsible AI in a Global Context:
Ethical Principles, Regulations and Laws

Ms. Eva Lichtenberger, Mr. Nikolaos Votsios, Mr. Ronan Hamon, Mr. Alexander Schindler
Session Chair: Mr. Helmut Leopold

13.30 - 14.30

Arena 21

Responsible AI in a Global Context:
Ethical Principles, Regulations and Laws

Ms. Eva Lichtenberger, former Member of the European Parlament, Union of European Federalists (UEF) Austria, Centre for European Policy Studies, Brussels

Mr. Nikolaos Votsios, Brig. General (ret.) Former International Relations Director of the Greek Ministry of Defence, , AUSTRIACARD AG

Mr. Ronan Hamon, Scientific Project Officer, European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Ispra, Italy

Mr. Alexander Schindler, Senior Scientist, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology

Session Chair: Mr. Helmut Leopold, Head of Center for Digital Safety & Security, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology 

Artificial Intelligence is currently seen as a key disruptive technology for our society. However, as robust as these systems can be, they may do "more societal harm than economic good" due to their opaqueness.  AI poses ethical concerns for our society: in privacy and surveillance area, bias, and discrimination. Therefore, we must design and govern AI systems to meet our ethical principles, regulations, and laws, to be accountable and explainable. We have to define standards and implement policies for its acceptable use in our society. This session will elaborate necessary AI strategies and activities for the next decade.

  • Do the current policies and regulations pay sufficient attention to the ethical questions of the effect of AI-innovations on socio-technical change?
  • When we address the accountability of AI, how do we hold a machine accountable?
  • Who are the responsible people for establishing ethics and policies for AI?

14.30 – 15.00

Break & Exhibition

15.00 – 16.00
SESSION 14

Digitalisation and Sustainability in International Crisis and Conflict Management: Introducing Smart Missions

Ms. Hanneke Brouwer (Online), Mr. Anders Garly Andersen (Online), Mr. Guy Bennett (Online), Mr. Michael Merker (Online)
Session Chair: Mr. Philipp Agathonos

15.00 - 16.00

Arena 21

Digitalisation and Sustainability in International Crisis and Conflict Management:
Introducing Smart Missions

Ms. Hanneke Brouwer, Seconded National Expert,  European Centre of Excellence for Civilian Crisis Management (Online)

Mr. Anders Garly Andersen, Deputy Head of Mission, European Union Border Assistance Mission, Libya (Online)

Mr. Guy Bennett, Team Leader, Situational Awareness in UN Peacekeeping (Online)

Mr. Michael Merker, Senior Adviser to the EU's Civilian Operations Commander, European External Action Service (EEAS) (Online)

Session Chair:

Philipp Agathonos, Head of Unit, Civilian Crisis Management, Federal Ministry for European and International Affairs, Austria

The ongoing fourth industrial revolution (Industry 4.0), centred on the digitization of processes and the fusion of technologies, affects all aspects of human interaction. It blurs the lines between the physical, digital, and biological spheres. Digital technologies also form an increasingly important part of the political landscape of conflicts. Digital activism is on the rise and the internet is used to initiate and drive popular movements.

The ability to influence perspectives and mobilise citizens through social media in general and the spread of disinformation and ‘fake news’, which threatens to polarise societies and fuel tensions leading to violent conflict in particular, is a very important factor that must be taken into account in current and future activities in the area of international crisis and conflict management.

EU, UN, OSCE and other actors in this field must be able to understand the digital ecosystem surrounding their activities and include it in their analysis and their strategic and operational plans. Digitalisation can also help crisis and conflict management actors to make better use of available human, financial and material resources and enhance the sustainability of their efforts. Has the time come to transform traditional UN peacekeeping operations, EU CSDP missions and operations or OSCE field missions into “smart missions”, based on state-of-the-art technological innovations? In this session, we will be looking into

  • a possible framework and the underlying principles for smart missions (availability, integrity, confidentiality, accountability)
  • use cases for technological solutions (border management, training, secure communications)
  • technology which enables receiving, analysing, and managing data in real-time to help missions and their counterparts in the host nation to make better decisions that contribute to sustainability and effectiveness
  • the role of the human factor in smart missions

16.00 – 17.00
SESSION 15

PeaceTech: Using Technology, Media and Data to Prevent or Transform Violent Conflicts and Build Peace

Mr. Moritz Ehrmann, Ms. Tuula Yrjölä, Mr. Guillem Riutord Sampol (Online)
Session Chair: Mr. Philipp Agathonos

16.00 - 17.00

Arena 21

PeaceTech: Using Technology, Media and Data to Prevent or Transform Violent Conflicts and Build Peace

Mr. Moritz Ehrmann, Director, Austrian Study Centre for Peace and Conflict Resolution

Ms. Tuula Yrjölä, Ambassador, Director of the Conflict Prevention Centre, Deputy Head of the OSCE Secretariat

Mr. Guillem Riutord Sampol, Head of Division, ISP.2 - Conflict Prevention and Mediation Support, European External Action Service (EEAS) (Online)

Session Chair:

Philipp Agathonos, Head of Unit, Civilian Crisis Management, Federal Ministry for European and International Affairs, Austria

As conflicts are changing with new technologies and moving fluidly between the world we live in and the cyber realm, state-of-the-art technologies play a central role in modern, increasingly atypical forms of conflict. Under the label PeaceTech, social media, geographic information systems, data analytics, Virtual Reality frameworks and other digital technologies can provide analytical support both to better understand and monitor conflicts and for situational awareness, create innovation in capacity building and training as well as scale peacebuilding efforts.

For example, artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning methods allow the processing of large amounts of data and media at an unprecedented speed, providing valuable input to analyses. Big data also improves early warning capacities allowing civilian crisis management actors to monitor trends, depict, anticipate and immediately react to an emerging crisis or a sudden change of the dynamics on the ground. At the same time, the use of digital technologies such as mixed or virtual reality training frameworks, online trainings, webinars, and digital distance learning solutions opens innovative, flexible and on-demand avenues in peacebuilding training and capacity building.

However, digital training solutions predicting conflicts and recognising escalations in time is only one side of the coin. Beyond that it is just as important to react when conflict could not be avoided. In this context, PeaceTech builds the basis for adequate conflict resolution approaches and the quick application of peacebuilding efforts on the ground to transform violent conflict. In doing so, PeaceTech ultimately enables sustainable development.

At the intersection of conflict, peace and technology, this session will look at:

  • efficiency gains through more consistent use of existing data and digital solutions (sentiment analysis, e.g. for public policy-making or network analysis, e.g. for conflict resolution),
  • developing linkages between data collection and its analysis by AI (e.g. through satellite-based technology or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for monitoring and documenting human rights crimes)
  • the potential of Open Source Intelligence (OS-INT – i.e., in social media, blogs, podcasts, online forums) to predict escalations of conflict and enable preventive action by peace workers
  • possible frameworks of an integrated PeaceTech approach in the operationalisation of peacebuilding and conflict resolution on the ground
  • creating avenues to build essential peacebuilding skills through the effective use of digital learning tools
  • the notion of "Tech Peace", i.e. algorithm ethics and the democratisation.

17.00 – 17.15
KEYNOTE

Closing Speech

Mr. Lukas Mandl, Member of the European Parliament, Subcommittee on Security and Defence, Vice President, Brussels (Online)

17.15 – 17.45

Conference Closing

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